News

Scaffolding and aerial lift safety

roofing safety

Falls from heights consistently rank as one of the most frequent—and most fatal—workplace accidents. They occur so often because exposure is everywhere: any surface 6 feet or more above ground level could cause injury. Scaffolding and aerial lifts are among the most common fall sources, so it’s important to follow all safety rules.

Scaffolding Safety

  • Always wear sturdy shoes with non-slip soles when working on scaffolding.
  • Do not keep debris or other material on the scaffold where they present a tripping hazard.
  • Use your best judgment in bad weather . Do not use a scaffold in especially stormy, windy or icy weather.

Aerial Lift Safety

  • Never climb over or lean on guard rails.
  • Do not enter an aerial lift that you know has not been properly maintained.

Proper Roofing Practices

Ensure your safety at heights

Working at heights is always dangerous, but roofing is responsible for a disproportionate number of fall injuries because of the nature of the surface. You have to deal with working at heights as well as on slanted and often slippery surfaces.

Several factors combine to create hazardous work situations on roofs, including the pitch, amount of moisture, presence of dirt or sawdust, your footwear and presence of tripping hazards.

Before you begin working, your supervisor should perform an evaluation of the conditions and set up all necessary safety equipment; however, that does not mean your safety is in someone else’s hands. It’s your responsibility to take your safety into your own hands, too.

In addition to falls, roofing presents hazards to those working below. Practice good housekeeping and never drop anything off the edge of the roof.

If you feel conditions are becoming unsafe as you work—for example, it is beginning to rain and the roof is becoming slippery—notify your supervisor immediately.

Did you know?

More than one-third of fall deaths in residential construction are caused by falls from roofs. Using a personal fall arrest system (PFAS), horizontal lifeline or rope grab decreases the likelihood of a fatal fall while roofing.

Download the attached PDF to learn more and to share with others.

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Mounting or dismounting a large truck or piece of equipment without hurting yourself seems simple, but many accidents involve this type of injury. The best way to prevent falling while getting into or out of a truck, tractor cab or heavy equipment is to follow the three-point contact system. Download the attached PDF’s to learn how to protect yourself.  Available in English and Spanish.

construction

When recruiting employees, you want as much
information as possible to make the best hires.

Preferred Insurance has partnered with Precise Hire to
offer discounted rates on background checks and
employment screening products, to help you mitigate
risk and keep your organization safe.

As a Preferred Insurance client, you will benefit from
Precise Hire’s industry leading data and screening
Best Practices, which will provide you with detailed
information on your applicants. You will also receive
compliance support, privacy and security when it
comes to protecting sensitive information.

Background Checks Help You:
• Improve the quality and retention of your new hires
• Minimize risk and reduce legal exposure
• Protect your employees, customers and stakeholders
• Reduce loss due to sexual offenses, violence or theft

Program Benefits:
• Preferred member pricing
• User-friendly web-based system
• Personal user ID & password
• As many user accounts as you need
• Customized background checks for your needs
• One comprehensive report on each applicant
• Client services support
• 24/7 access

SPECIAL PRICING
** Worker’s Comp Report: $10
* Pre-Hire Screening Package

SSN Trace & Address History Search
County Criminal Search From Address History
Nationwide Criminal Database Search
50-State Sex Offender Registries Search
US Federal Crimes Search

One County Package Price: $15
Two County Package Price: $25
Three County Package Price: $35
Unlimited County Package Price: $45

* Price tiers are based on the number of county criminal searches required from the applicant’s residential address history.

** The law requires that the Worker’s Comp search be conducted after an offer of employment has been made. All other searches contained in the screening package can be made pre-hire.

Some county courts charge a fee to access their records and some states charge a fee to access a Worker’s Comp report. If a fee applies, it will be added to the total price. Fee schedules will be provided upon request.

For more information or to get started, contact Andy
Andersen at (214) 548-3919 or send him an email to andy@precisehire.com.

Scaffolding and aerial lift safety

roofing safety

Falls from heights consistently rank as one of the most frequent—and most fatal—workplace accidents. They occur so often because exposure is everywhere: any surface 6 feet or more above ground level could cause injury. Scaffolding and aerial lifts are among the most common fall sources, so it’s important to follow all safety rules.

Scaffolding Safety

  • Always wear sturdy shoes with non-slip soles when working on scaffolding.
  • Do not keep debris or other material on the scaffold where they present a tripping hazard.
  • Use your best judgment in bad weather . Do not use a scaffold in especially stormy, windy or icy weather.

Aerial Lift Safety

  • Never climb over or lean on guard rails.
  • Do not enter an aerial lift that you know has not been properly maintained.

Proper Roofing Practices

Ensure your safety at heights

Working at heights is always dangerous, but roofing is responsible for a disproportionate number of fall injuries because of the nature of the surface. You have to deal with working at heights as well as on slanted and often slippery surfaces.

Several factors combine to create hazardous work situations on roofs, including the pitch, amount of moisture, presence of dirt or sawdust, your footwear and presence of tripping hazards.

Before you begin working, your supervisor should perform an evaluation of the conditions and set up all necessary safety equipment; however, that does not mean your safety is in someone else’s hands. It’s your responsibility to take your safety into your own hands, too.

In addition to falls, roofing presents hazards to those working below. Practice good housekeeping and never drop anything off the edge of the roof.

If you feel conditions are becoming unsafe as you work—for example, it is beginning to rain and the roof is becoming slippery—notify your supervisor immediately.

Did you know?

More than one-third of fall deaths in residential construction are caused by falls from roofs. Using a personal fall arrest system (PFAS), horizontal lifeline or rope grab decreases the likelihood of a fatal fall while roofing.

Download the attached PDF to learn more and to share with others.

With the right ladder and proper use, working above ground level should be no problem. Make sure you have an appropriate ladder and use correct technique for placement and climbing.

Construction Safety

Fiberglass Ladder – Delamination on Side Rails

Issue:  A fiberglass Man-Hole style ladder designed for a safe working load of 300 pounds was being used to Enter/Exit an excavation.  The side rails of the ladder delaminated causing the ladder to fail.  The ladder was 2 years old.

What Happened

When the worker placed his weight on the ladder the side rails failed causing the worker to fall approximately six feet into the excavation.  The worker sustained minor injuries.

ladder1a

A general inspection prior to use did not reveal separation in the side rails of the ladder.

firstladder

Closer inspection of the side rails revealed cracks and delamination of the side rail.

When the worker placed his weight on the ladder to side rail separated and could not support the weight.  The ladder bowed causing the worker to fall into an excavation.

secondladder

Delamination occurred on both side rails.

ladder4bb

Corrective Action

All fiberglass ladders are inspected on the inside portion of the side rails and placed on an angle and pressure is applied to the side rails to determine if any cracks or delamination has occurred prior to the ladder being used.

Ladder Safety Checklist

To prevent falls from ladders, make sure you have the following controls in place:

  • Use only ladders that are in good condition and designed to handle the climbing job that needs to be done.
  • Train employees on proper ladder use.
  •  Make proper ladder use a performance requirement for the job.
  •  Require employees to complete a ladder inspection before each use.

Criteria for Ladder Purchase and Care

  • Check OSHA standards for the type of ladder you are using.
  • Use only Underwriter’s Laboratory approved ladders (will have the UL seal).
  • Protect wood ladders with a clear sealer, such as varnish, shellac, linseed oil or wood preservative because paint can hide defects. 

Ladder Usage

  • Be sure step ladders are fully open and locked before climbing them.
  • Place ladder on a flat, secure surface.
  • Place ladder on a hard surface as it will sink into a soft surface.
  • Place ladder on non-movable base.
  • Lean ladder against a secure surface, not boxes or barrels.
  • Do not place ladder in front of a door.
  • Position base of ladder one foot away for every four feet of height to where it rests (1:4 ratio).
  • Ladder rails should extend at least three feet above top landing.
  • Check shoes to ensure they are free of grease or mud.
  • Mount the ladder from the center, not from the side.
  • Face ladder when ascending or descending, and hold on with both hands.
  • Carry tools in pockets, in a bag attached to a belt, or raised and lowered by rope.
  • Don’t climb higher than the third rung from the top.
  • Work facing the ladder.
  • Do not overreach, always keep your torso between the ladder rails.
  • When using ladder for high places, securely lash or fasten the ladder to prevent slipping.
  • Avoid outdoor ladder use on windy days.
  • Avoid aluminum ladders if work must be done around electrical wires 

Support Information

For more information on ladder design and safety, please see more information published by the American Ladder Institute at:

http://www.laddersafety.org

Download as a PDF – English.

Download as a PDF – Spanish.

 

 

 

Working at heights is always dangerous, but roofing is responsible for a disproportionate number of fall injuries because of the nature of the surface. You have to deal with working at heights as well as on slanted and often slippery surfaces. Several factors combine to create hazardous work situations on roofs, including the pitch, amount of moisture, presence of dirt or sawdust, your footwear and presence of tripping hazards. (more…)