Safety at all Heights

Scaffolding and aerial lift safety

roofing safety

Falls from heights consistently rank as one of the most frequent—and most fatal—workplace accidents. They occur so often because exposure is everywhere: any surface 6 feet or more above ground level could cause injury. Scaffolding and aerial lifts are among the most common fall sources, so it’s important to follow all safety rules.

Scaffolding Safety

  • Always wear sturdy shoes with non-slip soles when working on scaffolding.
  • Do not keep debris or other material on the scaffold where they present a tripping hazard.
  • Use your best judgment in bad weather . Do not use a scaffold in especially stormy, windy or icy weather.

Aerial Lift Safety

  • Never climb over or lean on guard rails.
  • Do not enter an aerial lift that you know has not been properly maintained.

Proper Roofing Practices

Ensure your safety at heights

Working at heights is always dangerous, but roofing is responsible for a disproportionate number of fall injuries because of the nature of the surface. You have to deal with working at heights as well as on slanted and often slippery surfaces.

Several factors combine to create hazardous work situations on roofs, including the pitch, amount of moisture, presence of dirt or sawdust, your footwear and presence of tripping hazards.

Before you begin working, your supervisor should perform an evaluation of the conditions and set up all necessary safety equipment; however, that does not mean your safety is in someone else’s hands. It’s your responsibility to take your safety into your own hands, too.

In addition to falls, roofing presents hazards to those working below. Practice good housekeeping and never drop anything off the edge of the roof.

If you feel conditions are becoming unsafe as you work—for example, it is beginning to rain and the roof is becoming slippery—notify your supervisor immediately.

Did you know?

More than one-third of fall deaths in residential construction are caused by falls from roofs. Using a personal fall arrest system (PFAS), horizontal lifeline or rope grab decreases the likelihood of a fatal fall while roofing.

Download the attached PDF to learn more and to share with others.